Champhai

Often regarded as the ‘Fruit Bowl of Mizoram’, Champhai is on the go-to list of every individual who visits this lovely north-eastern state of India. Nested along the Indo-Myanmar border, this district is quite active when it comes to trade with its neighboring nation. As far as history is concerned, legend says that the history of Mizo begins and ends with Champhai. In fact, the hamlets scattered across the town are dotted with monuments and monoliths. Each one of them depicts something or the other – success in war, valorous hunting or even personal milestones. And quite like Mizoram’s vibrancy, Champhai not just boast of its tribal traditions, orchids and butterflies, but also of rows and rows of vineyards. Adding beauty to the place are a chain of green hills encircling the vast expanses of rice fields and the famous Rihdil Lake, located on the other side of the Myanmar border.

In the 90s, Champhai became home to the Murlen National Park. The interesting bit about this park is that it is often compared to the forests in the Amazon. With only a miniscule amount of sunlight being able to penetrate the forest on a sunny day, the thickness of the forest in the park rakes up parallels with similar South American regions. Often called the ‘land of no-return’, it is home to a rich variety of exotic flora and fauna.

Thenzawl

Not very far from the capital city of Mizoram, Thenzawl was known for its dense forests till it got inhabited, almost very recently in 1961. Amidst the tales of wild animals and jungle living, thrives a never-seen-before, traditional Mizo handloom industry. This industry produces rich and colorful handlooms, year after year and in the process, showcases some fine indigenous weaving techniques of the Mizos. Thenzawl is also known for its famous, Vantawng Waterfall, closely followed by its deer park.

Aizawl

The hustling bustling capital of Mizoram never ceases to amaze – be it with its sheer size, architecture or a very distinct and heterogeneous population. This city, in fact, was born out of the misconduct of Khalkom, a Mizo chief, which forced the British to establish an outpost that later became Aizawl village. The misfortunate beginning aside, it is home to some of the more important government centres of Mizoram as well as nature’s finest – the Durtlang Hills & Hmuifang, a mountain covered with virgin forests and preserved since forever.

There is a lot to do for the everyday traveler making a visit to Aizawl. There is the Bara Bazaar, which is thronged by people in their lovely traditional dresses and is the hubbub of all market activity with its wide variety of garments on display. Wishing to catch up on Mizo history and culture? Look no further than the Mizoram State Museum located at the centre of the city. And it doesn’t end there as this 140 something year old city offers a lot more with breathtaking caves, decorated temples and a village that houses the world’s largest family.

Reiek

Surrounded by thick lush trees and bushes, the Reiek Hill stands high above Mizoram, overlooking the other popular destinations. If one’s lucky, apart from the breathtaking view of the surrounding valley and hills – a visit to Reiek might just give a glimpse of the magnificent plains of Bangladesh. What more, there exists this chance to go visit the one of its kind, traditional Mizo village that Reiek has to offer, with tiny traditional huts peppered around the place for different people – one can’t help but feel transported back into time.

The talking point each year is the Anthurium Festival. With an idea to promote Anthurium flower and the typically rich Mizo culture, this festival is a hit amongst tourists of all kinds. On display are the rich, rhythmic dances of Mizoram and a fun variety of games, not forgetting the popular fashion shows of course. Another fascinating aspect of this tourist spot is its wildlife. As after all, it is home to a wide variety of exotic birds, including the rare Peregrine falcon which one might see perched on a lofty ledge or swooping on cliff swallows. So, take out the cameras, take out the trekking gear – Reiek is the next best place to be!